Projects
 

Morten Hertzum
 
 

LabVis (2015-2018) devises and evaluates more effective solutions for visualizing abnormal lab-test results for patients with chronic diseases. A key idea will be to identify abnormal trends by their deviation from values expected for patients with the chronic disease, rather than for people without the disease. The designed visualizations will be evaluated for their effect on clinical decisions. The project funds one PhD student. Academic partners: Norwegian University of Science and Technology and University of Copenhagen. Funded by the Central Norway Regional Health Authority.

Clinical Communication (2012-2017) addresses clinicians' need for support in their communication (a) internally at their department and (b) across departments. This communication will be supported by electronic whiteboards, available on wall-mounted displays, stationary computers, and mobile devices such as smartphones. The project, which is a continuation of the Clinical Overview project, currently funds three PhD students. Academic partners: University of Copenhagen and Roskilde University. Non-academic partners: Region Zealand and Imatis. Co-funded by Innovation Norway.

CoSound (2014-2017) focuses on developing and evaluating tools for supporting the retrieval of music and other audio data from large corpora. The targeted use domain for the tools is digital humanities. The project funds one PhD student at the University of Copenhagen. Academic partners: Technical University of Denmark, University of Copenhagen, Queen Mary University of London, University College London, University of Glasgow, and Aalborg University. Non-academic partners: B&O, Danish Broadcasting Corporation, Geckon, Hindenburg Systems, Musikzonen, State and University Library, and Syntonetic. Co-funded by the Danish Strategic Research Council.

Effects-Driven IT Development (2005-2017) investigates how, and to what extent, the relationship between IT vendors and customers can be based on specification and measurement of the effects to be achieved by using IT solutions. Our goal is to devise effects-driven ways of managing IT projects and, ultimately, a commercial contract model where customer payments are dependent on measurable effects of using the vendor’s system. The project has funded three PhD students. Academic partners: University of Copenhagen and Roskilde University. Non-academic partners: Region Zealand and CSC Scandihealth. Co-funded by: Ministry of Higher Education and Science.

IT Support for Clinical Overview during Pre-Hospital Care (2010-2013) involved analysis, development, organizational implementation, and evaluation of IT systems for supporting clinicians in forming and maintaining an overview. The project specifically focused on the pre-hospital stage (i.e., ambulance care) and on the transition from the pre-hospital stage to the emergency department. The project funded two PhD students. Academic partner: Roskilde University. Non-academic partner: Region of Southern Denmark.

Clinical Overview (2009-2012) involved analysis, development, organizational implementation, and evaluation of systems for supporting clinicians in forming and maintaining an overview. The project specifically focused on emergency departments, which were new in Denmark, and on the presentation and use of selected information about all patients at a ward via large, shared displays. The project funded two PhD students. Academic partner: Roskilde University. Non-academic partners: Region Zealand and Imatis. Co-funded by: Vækstforum Sjælland and Innovation Norway.

SourceIT (2008-2011). The ability of IT organizations to be innovative is central to their success. This project aimed to investigate how innovativeness is affected by and can be improved by different kinds of sourcing. The development of IT systems increasingly involves insourcing, outsourcing, and partnership sourcing, but the strategic potential of sourcing in relation to innovativeness is largely unexplored. Academic partner: Roskilde University. Non-academic partners: Delta, CSC Scandihealth, Danske Bank, and Nets. Co-funded by: Danish Agency for Science, Technology, and Innovation.

Usability Evaluation of Safety-Critical Systems (2006-2010). Safety-critical systems are particularly difficult to evaluate because the work domains are complex and critical incidents may pose requirements very different from those of day-to-day operation. This project aimed to investigate evaluation methods, such as thinking aloud, in relation to evaluation of safety-critical systems in order to improve the reliability of the methods, scrutinize their validity, and suggest improvements of the methods. The project funded one PhD student. Partners: Roskilde University and Risø National Laboratory.

Cultural Usability (2006-2009) aimed to investigate the impact of culture on the results of established methods of usability testing. The production, evaluation, and use of technologically advanced information and communication applications are not restricted to the Western world. This project investigated the cultural specifics that go into usability evaluation in three countries: Denmark, India, and China. The project involved senior researchers in all three countries. Academic partners: Copenhagen Business School (DK), Indian Institute of Technology (IN), Chinese Academy of Sciences (CN), Roskilde University (DK), and University of Copenhagen (DK). Non-academic partners: Honeywell Corporation (USA), Nokia Denmark (DK), and Snitker (DK). Co-funded by: Danish Research Agency.

Healthcare IT (2004-2007) focused on IT supported communication and coordination in the healthcare domain. The purpose of the project was to develop conceptual frameworks, design principles, prototypes, and methods to support the design, implementation, and use of collaborative healthcare information systems. The project co-funded two PhD students at Roskilde University. Academic partners: Roskilde University, IT University of Copenhagen, and Technical University of Denmark. Non-academic partners: Novo Nordisk IT, AstraZeneca, Kræftens Bekæmpelse, Sundhedsforvaltningen Københavns Kommune, and Den fælles offentlige Sundhedsportal. Co-funded by: Danish Research Councils.

CMT (2004-2006) aimed to develop contextual models of trust. While trust, in some form, is inherent in all human relationships the CMT project focused on the issue of trust in relation to the design of systems for people finding and software-component reuse. The purpose of the project was to investigate the prospects of recording information about the use of people sources and software components and subsequently utilizing this information for building trust models to support later users of the people-finding or component-reuse system. Partners: Roskilde University and University of Strathclyde. Co-funded by: British Royal Society.

Voice Recognition for Safety-Critical Applications (2003-2006) aimed to investigate voice recognition in the context of anaesthesia. Using voice recognition for dictating documentation of anaesthetic procedures as they unfold requires real-time performance, contrary to applications that involve time-consuming revision of the initially recognized text. The project funded one PhD student. Partners: Roskilde University and Risø National Laboratory. Co-funded by: the European research training network ADVISES (Analysis, Design and Validation of Interactive Safety-critical and Error-tolerant Systems).

RUC Online (2003-2004) aimed at following and evaluating a large-scale effort to provide comprehensive computer support for study activities at Roskilde University. The facilities made available to the students included, among others, a campus-wide wireless network and a CSCW system for use in the students’ coursework and projects. The project investigated the introduction and adoption of these facilities as well as their social and study-related effects. Partners: Computer Science and Communication Studies, Roskilde University.

Security and Usability of e-Banking (2003). At the concrete level, this project assessed the security and usability of contemporary Danish e-banking systems. At the conceptual level, the project was about usable security – that is, about how security mechanisms can resolve the apparent conflict between security and ease of use. Partner: Roskilde University. Co-funded by: Development Centre for Electronic Business.

Centre for Human-Computer Interaction (1998-2002). The centre was a collaboration between Risø National Laboratory, University of Aarhus, Technical University of Denmark, Danish Maritime Institute, and Danfoss a/s and was established with the overall objectives to develop Danish research in human-machine interaction. Funded by: Danish National Research Foundation.

GRIS (2000-2002) investigated information-seeking behaviors in structured document retrieval. In structured document retrieval, the retrieval algorithm must continually decide whether to return entire documents or specific parts of documents. The purpose of the project was to explore ways of making this decision. We saw this as an elaboration and evaluation of the notion of best entry points. Partners: Risø National Laboratory and University of London. Co-funded by: British Royal Society.

COLLATE (2000-2002). Project intended to design, implement, and evaluate a Web-based collaboratory that provided cooperative facilities for annotation, indexing, and retrieval of multi-format, multimedia material about European films and film making in the 1920s and 1930s. Academic partners: Risø National Laboratory, Fraunhofer IPSI, University of Bari. Non-academic partners: Deutsches Filminstitut, Filmarchiv Austria, Národní Filmovy Archiv, and Sword ICT. Risø was responsible for user requirements and system evaluation. Funded by: European Union.

COTCOS (1998). A training and Mobility of Researchers project aimed at integrating work in cognitive engineering, cooperative work, and multimedia technologies. Partners: University of Limerick, King’s College, Technical University of Denmark, University of Sussex, University of Liege, ARAMIIHS-IRIT CNRS, University of Siena, and University of Rouen. COTCOS funded my Post Doc at University of Limerick, Ireland. Funded by: European Union.

ADVISER II (1998) aimed to design, implement, and evaluate a web-based service that provided researchers, industrial R&D laboratories, and small and medium sized enterprises with access to research data and contact persons from EU-funded projects. Academic partners: University of Limerick, University of Leeds, Ghent University, and Western Norway Research Institute. Non-academic partners: Technopolis CSATA Novus Ortis, VDI/VDE-IT, MAC ltd., and Clear Communication Associates. Funded by: European Union.

INFOPOLIS II (1998) aimed to provide advanced passenger information services via mechanisms such as public information kiosks. Academic partners: University of Limerick, Université Libre de Bruxelles, Institut National de Recherche sur les Transports et leur Sécurité, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Universidade Tecnica de Lisboa. Non-academic partners: CETE Méditerranée, Lumiplan, SOMAT Ltd., SNCF, Traficon Ltd., TransExpert, Verkehrs- und Tarifverbund Stuttgart GmbH, Consorcio Transportes Madrid, and Austin Analytics. Funded by: European Union.